Sunday, August 8, 2010

Osteogenic Sarcoma and Back Pain



When doctors access osteoarthritis and osteoporosis, they will also consider Osteogenic sarcoma, or Osteosarcoma. The symptoms are amazingly similar in comparison, yet different in several ways. For instance, if osteoporosis is present the patient will experience back and joint pain, fatigue, and so on. Likewise, if Osteogenic sarcoma is present the patient may feel pain, limited range of motion (ROM), immobility, and so on.



Osteogenic sarcoma is a malignant or benign bone tumor, yet when Osteogenic sarcoma is present, the bone malignant is present. The tumor causes invasion of the ends that rest at the elongated bones. Etiology aspects claim that Osteogenic sarcoma may limit certain activities, such as osteolytic and osteoblastic.



The physical aspects are considered when the cell growth is unregulated and controlled by linking cell divisions. If lack of control and regulation is present, it can result in growth of abnormal tissue, which contains a tumor and/or tissues. Osteoblastic activities may cause bone-forming cells (Osteoblastic) to overdevelop or under develop the bones. Anytime the connective tissues are interrupted, it causes intense problems over the entire body.



When osteoblasts start, the tumor begins dissolving the soft tissue and the bones, which presents danger, since the growth can travel to the lungs. (Tumors may be growth that develops into cancer, which emerges from lumps or swelling)



Symptoms:
When Osteogenic sarcoma is present, the patient may experience pain. Limited mobility is present as well, which causes weakness and can lead to fractures. The soft tissues often mass, spreading over the site where the tumor resides and causes the tissues to heat. The body temperature will elevate, which increases the symptoms.



How doctors diagnose Osteogenic sarcoma?

Doctors will often use a variety of tests, such as bone scans, aspirations to test bone marrow, biopsy, CT (Computerized Tomography) scans, blood chemistry, and so on.



Once the tests are completed and if increases in alkaline phosphatase, cancer cells, mass, etc are noted, a diagnostics is set in motion. The diagnostic leads to medical management, nurse intervention, care, etc, which doctors will then monitor the patient to weed out further complications.



Further complications may include metastasis and/or fractures. Fractures are severe, yet metastasis is spreading of cancer that starts from the tumor. Once it begins to spread, it travels through the body, exporting its tiny clumps to the cells and transports itself via the blood or in the lymph. The tumor is malignant, which develops and spreads if cancer is present. Osteogenic sarcoma then is dangerous.











Treatment:
Doctors often recommend a high-protein diet. The patient is also monitored, and treated with heparin lock therapy. As well, the patient is recommended radiation therapy, lab studies, etc. Calcium and phosphorus is also prescribed. While Osteogenic sarcoma can cause back pain, it is wise to seek information from ACS. (American Cancer Society) Having an overall view of your diagnostics can help you focus on finding a cure, or better health.



ROM exercises, painkillers, and so forth are often prescribed when Osteogenic sarcoma is present. While the pain often starts in the various areas, thus it can spread throughout the body. The patient is often prescribed NSAID. Some activities are limited, since it can increase the pain. The patient is also advised to avoid infectious people.



Nurse intervention often includes various treatments, which the purpose is to avert further complications, such as paralytic ileus, urine retention, sensory/motor deficits, infection, and muscle spasms.



In addition to Osteogenic sarcoma causing back pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, spinal fusions, gouty arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis can all cause back pain. Rheumatoid arthritis is perhaps an autoimmune disease. Ultimately, it is transmitting through genetics.

Organic Foods Equal Improved Health




Organic food is food that is free from all genetically modified organisms, produced without artificial pesticides and fertilizers and derived from an animal reared without the routine use of antibiotics, growth promoters or other drugs. Once only available in small stores or farmers' markets, organic foods are becoming much more widely available

Organic foods have been shown to improve your immune system, help you sleep better, shed the excess weight more easily, and improve your blood work just to name a few. Organic food can boast intense, realistic flavors, and a higher vitamin and mineral content.

And though logically it makes sense to consume a diet based on organic foods, some worry about the cost. But with careful planning and preparation, going organic is actually quite affordable. And, the peace of mind knowing you and your family are consuming foods that haven’t been treated with pesticides or genetically altered is worth the extra money spent.

The pesticides used by conventional farmers can have many negative influences on your health, including neurotoxicity, disruption of your endocrine system, carcinogenicity and immune system suppression. Pesticide exposure may also affect male reproductive function and has been linked to miscarriages in women. Additionally, conventional produce tends to have fewer nutrients than organic produce. On average, conventional produce has only 83 percent of the nutrients of organic produce. Studies have found significantly higher levels of nutrients such as vitamin C, iron, magnesium and phosphorus, and significantly less nitrates (a toxin) in organic crops.

So it’s a smart idea to buy and eat organic produce and free-range organic foods as much as possible for maximum health benefits. In addition, the knowledge that you’re supporting the organic foods industry that is dedicated to protecting the environment by steering clear of harmful pesticides and chemicals that can result in the loss of topsoil, toxic runoff and resulting water pollution, soil contamination and poisoning and the death of insects, birds, critters and beneficial soil organisms should help you feel even better.

Nutritional Hope for Schizophrenic Patients

Schizophrenia is a difficult malady, both to diagnose and to treat. It’s defined as any of a group of psychotic disorders usually characterized by withdrawal from reality, illogical patterns of thinking, delusions, and hallucinations, and accompanied in varying degrees by other emotional, behavioral, or intellectual disturbances. Recent research suggests that those who suffer from schizophrenia could benefit from incorporating more B3 (niacin), essential fatty acids (EFAs) and eating more whole grain carbohydrates to help level out blood sugar levels so that bouts with hypoglycemia are lessened and nutrition is maintained.

Food sources high in niacin include light-meat chicken, tuna, salmon, turkey, enriched flour, peanuts, and fortified cereals. Niacin is an important player in the digestion process, and it aids in converting food into energy. Therefore, it also plays a role in the essential fatty acid metabolism of the brain, processes of which are disrupted in schizophrenia.

Because these processes are disrupted in the brain, it’s imperative that essential fatty acids are a base in the diet of a schizophrenic patient. Since they can’t be synthesized by the body, they must be obtained from food. Look to fish, shellfish, flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, dark green leafy vegetables and walnuts for EFAs. Essential fatty acids play a part in many metabolic processes, and there is evidence to suggest that low levels of essential fatty acids, or the wrong balance of types among the essential fatty acids, may be a factor in a number of illnesses, including schizophrenia.

Some schizophrenic patients also suffer from bouts of hypoglycemia, which can be greatly helped by choosing healthy, whole grain carbohydrates such as whole grain breads and pastas, as they help the body maintain a steady blood glucose level. Other research shows that some schizophrenic patients suffer from food allergies that greatly affect their thinking and behavior. For this reason, keeping a detailed food journal and paying close attention to moods and thinking patterns after eating is imperative.

Research has also shown that some schizophrenic patients suffer from high levels of copper, an essential metallic element that can adversely affect the brain in high doses. Vitamin B6, found in bananas, turkey and spinach, as well as zinc, found in red meats, peanuts, chickpeas and almonds, can help remove excess copper from the body.