Friday, August 6, 2010

Ligaments and Tendons Causing Back Pain

Once the fibers, nerves, and muscles are affected, it causes direct actions to the tendons and ligaments. Tendons are tough bands that connect to muscles and bones, which these inelastic cords or bands of tough white fibers connect to tissues that attach to the muscles and to the bones as well as other areas of the body. Sinew or tendons join with ligaments, which the two function from collagen. Tendons connect to the muscles, which initiates movement, or contractions that enforce bone movement. In some areas the tendons will connect to the muscles and then to the bones. In this area, tendons will exert a pulling force that causes the bones to respond, by moving. The bones move, yet the tendons will hold the bones securely in position. Tendons provide a measure of stability. At the back, the tendons provide slight exertion, which promotes bending. Tendons will elongate so that you can bend forward, which promotes the action of muscles known as “eccentric contraction.” Once eccentric contractions start, the muscles and tendons join to allow you to continue what you were doing at the start of bending forward. This promotes what doctors call “Isometric contractions.” Sometimes tendons fail, as we grow older to work with the muscles, which in turn causes nerve compression, breakage, or conflict etc, which causes back pain. Now, if the nerve compression, or tendons fail and they rub alongside the soft pocket that is amid the bone, which overlaps and protect other bones, we have problems. (Bursa) Since the tension applied effects the muscles, and it is too weighty for the muscle nerves to withstand, thus the tendons use its sensory nerves to slow down, or hold back the muscles from moving.

Ligaments are tough tissues that connect to various body parts, which these sheets and/or bands of strong fibrous tissues connect bone to the bone and to the cartilages at the joint and /or supporting organs, such as muscles.

Ligaments keep the distance at bay between the bones. Like tendons, you do not want to tear or strain these connective elements, since it can cause inflammatory. In short, we need to balance tendons and ligaments to avoid back pain that comes from injuries.

Tendons make up the skeletal anatomy in some areas and consist of “206 bones,” which are flat, short, long, and sometimes asymmetrical. These tendons combine with bones store narrow (RBC) red blood cells, calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium. Since experts will recommend Maalox, which has bases of magnesium it can be speculated that this has something to do with pain as well.

Tendons support the muscles, movement, and protect various internal organs. In addition, tendons join with the skeletal muscles, and finally the ligaments. The skeletal muscles support the bodies movement and posture, which these muscles tighten and shorten movement. (Contracting) The skeletal muscles attach to the bones through the tendons and starts muscle contraction from stimulus of fibers from the muscles and via the motor unit or neurons.

Contractions promote energy from ATP (adenosine Triphosphate) and hydrolysis. The energy derives from these two creations and extends to ADP (Adenosine Diphosphate) and on to phosphate. Once the chemicals and/or substances produce, it moves to retain selective contractions to afford tone of the muscles. In short, balance is achieved, which moves to relax the muscles by breaking down acetylcholine via cholinesterase.

We are now reaching the ligaments. Once we reach the ligament phase, it starts to encircle the joints and adds stability and strength. Now it connects to the tendons, which connect the muscles to the bones. Joints are connected to these elements of the skeletal muscles, which when ROM is interrupted, back pain occurs.

Injuries and Back Pain

Injuries can cause back pain, including injuries to the upper limbs, shoulders, neck, spine, etc. Injuries can occur also cause back pain if the rotator cuffs are disturbed. The rotator cuffs comprise acromion, tendons, such as the rotator cuffs, which rest at the upper bones at the arm, and connect with rotator cuff muscles. The muscles are at the top of the upper arm bones, and below the shoulder joints. Rotator cuffs are clusters of smaller muscles, tendons, etc, and attach to various parts of the body. If the tendons are torn and/or ruptured it can cause back pain. The injuries usually occur when sudden impacts or forces target the region. Exerting the muscles can also cause injury. If the tendons are damaged, it causes inflammation and swelling, which obviously creates pain.

Such problems are treated with rest, ice packs, compression, and elevation. Shoulder injuries are seen when the arm is thrown out of socket. The injuries occur from falls, overexerting muscles, etc. The doctor considers such injuries carefully, since fractures may arise, which start within the humerus. In some instances, surgery is mandatory to correct the problem.

Additional injuries include arc pain, shoulder freeze, tendonitis, subacromial bursa, acromio-clavicular, and so on. The Bursa is a sac filled with fluids that serve as padding to reduce friction. The purpose of the bursa is to make movement easy and to avert rubbing of the joints. The bursa can cause problems when the shoulders are suddenly tossed over the head. Treatment for subacromial bursa conditions, include steroid regimens, physical therapy, meds, etc, especially when inflammations sets in. The condition can cause back pain, since bursa is an assistant to the joints, cartilages, bones, and synovium. Bursa works by playing down the risks of joint damage. If bursa inflames it compresses the nerves, or tendons. What happens after is failure, especially once the joints rub. The soft pockets amid the bones that overlap and protect other bones can cause serious back pain, since inflammation has set in from bursa disorders. The tension caused from inflammation hits the muscles, overexerting these muscles, which the sensory nerves are slowed down and movement is limited.

Posture is the pose we receive from bearing muscles and joints. If a person slouches, often it can cause back pain, since the muscles and joints are not moving, as they should. Physical therapy and meds are often employed to correct the problem. Sitting at long intervals can also cause back problems, especially if the lower back is not supported. In fact, sitting incorrectly can bend the spine at the lower back and cause serious pain. Back pain in this nature may arrive from sport activities as well, such as heavy lifting, repeated twisting, and so on. Slouches can correct back problems by learning how to sit and stand in proper positions. The back when damaged from slouching affects the lumbar. In addition, the slouchier will need to learn correct techniques of lifting.

Back pain can arrive from slipped disk, sciatica, sacro-iliac, etc. Slip disks is a Herniated nucleus pulposa (HNP) disorder. Slip disks is rupturing of the “intervertebral disk.” The intervertebral disk sits amid the Spinal Columns and next to the backbone.

Slipped disks start at the spinal canal, nerves, gelatinous core, and finally at the disks. When the nerve roots are pressured, the disk can slip, causing herniated nucleus pulposa. Sciatica is a sort of slipped disk, since the pain sends sharp, electrical shock-like pain down the canal of the spine, sending a distressing ache that starts at the back. The pain carries onto the legs. The pain is at times intermittent, yet other times it can lead to chronic pain syndrome. Surgical procedures are often required to correct the problem.

Importance of Warming Up Before Exercise

Since a lot of people are involved in physical exercises, it is imperative that the importance of warming up before any strenuous activity should be discussed. Many have repeatedly ignored going through the warm up stage before working out, not knowing the consequences in doing so.

Why warm up? Several changes takes place in the body once physical activity is initiated. A person's respiratory rate, blood flow, and oxygen and nutrient levels delivered to the cells increases. The rate of increase should be regulated in a steady pace to prepare the body for the physical stress that exercise will demand. If one foregoes this priming procedure, the body will function less efficiently and the workout will produce less quality results. Warming up preps up the nervous system, heightens mental awareness and alertness, and loosens up joints and muscles to make them less prone to injuries. Warm ups jump starts the fluid located in the joints, minimizing the risk for wear and tear of the muscles. It gives the heart a suitable period to adjust and pump up blood and nutrients into muscles.

This is vital for older people, since they have tissues that are less supple; they have joints with less fluid, and weaker hearts. Sudden exercise can produce heart attacks to older people.

How does a person warm up properly? Initially, it can be done in any procedure that enables the heart to beat faster. One can simply walk and jog, or if a cardiovascular equipment is available, such as rowing machine or a bicycle, it can be utilized. Start at a gentle pace, and then slowly increase the pace until heart beat rate increases and the body temperature rises. It important to note that the pace should be in accordance to one's current fitness level, where the activity will leave the person energized and not exhausted.

After working up a light sweat (suggested time is 3-5 minutes, longer if the person is working out in a cold environment) one should do dynamic stretching. Stretching helps in developing overall flexibility, particularly in the spine, shoulder, and hip areas. The kind of stretching depends on the type of activity a person plans to engage to. For instance, if one is about to play sports, the recommended kind of stretching would be the ones that mimics the movements that will be done in the court or field. If one is about to do martial arts, light sparring can be done in the quarter of the normal speed, or just simply do the movements in slow motion. Be certain that the major muscles groups are stretched for 8 seconds minimum. It is necessary to remember to keep feet moving or do leg exercises whenever the upper body is stretched to keep prevent blood from pooling in the legs. Remember, one should only do stretching if the muscles are already warmed up. Do not bounce while stretching. It leads to a contraction that can result in muscle tear or pull.

For weight-lifters, this is what should be done after the initial warm up. Load the bar with about 50-60% of the heaviest weight to be done for the session and perform the number of repetitions that will be done for the heavy sets. For the second set, the weight will be increased to 80%, then eventually to 90%, decreasing to 2-3 repetitions. Afterwards, rest for about 30 seconds, then repeat the steps. After this warm up, one can now proceed to the heavy lifting for the day. The advantage of doing the procedure is that the heavy sets will feel less daunting and can now be performed with considerably less stress.

After warming up and proceeding to the main workout, it is equally important to cool down. When a person suddenly stops exercising or lifting weights, blood gathers in the muscle and oxygen is blocked. When this happens, a person runs the risk of having a heart attack. So cooling down should have the same importance as warming up.

Exercise is good for the health. Everyone is encouraged to pump it up, just remember to remember all the necessary precautions not only to maximize the workout, but also to stay safe and healthy.